Windows Command Prompt, CMD (Command Shell and PowerShell) Capabilities

It is worth noting that all currently supported versions of Windows (server and client) have a set of Win32 console commands built-in. These commands were built-in windows to help us automate tasks on windows flawlessly.

Most IT experts that have used MS-DOS in the past are pretty familiar with the command line. In newer versions of Windows, users no longer have access to some of the familiar commands as presented in MS-DOS but some do. The Command Prompt in Windows provides access to over 280 commands.

These commands are helpful in automating certain operating system tasks from a command-line interface instead of the graphical Windows interface.

Command shell and PowerShell: These shells both fulfil the same purpose but PowerShell was expanded to provide a more robust scripting capability of the command shell to run PowerShell cmdlets. These commands are similar but have more capabilities than the regular Windows Commands.

Each shell is a software program that provides direct communication between you and the operating system or application, providing an environment to automate IT operations.

Whoami: Take a look on this link to see how this utility works, one of Windows built-in Command Prompt https://techdirectarchive.com/2020/02/06/how-to-use-the-whoami-in-windows/

Netplwiz” “userpasswords2”: For how to remove (dDisable) your login password (Sign-in Screen) from Windows |And Re-Activate Sign-in Screen, see https://techdirectarchive.com/2019/11/24/remove-disable-your-login-password-from-windows/

MSinfo32 and Systeminfo.exe: Take a look at this article and see how it works https://techdirectarchive.com/2019/05/11/how-to-use-system-information-msinfo32-command-line-tool-switches/

For more commands, take a look at the command line reference links.
https://www.makeuseof.com/tag/15-cmd-commands-every-windows-user-know/
https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/administration/windows-commands/commands-by-server-role
https://ss64.com/nt/

For tutorials on PowerShell, see https://mindmajix.com/powershell-tutorial

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